Journal 12/28/2012 (a.m.)

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Journal 12/26/2012 (a.m.)

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Journal 12/16/2012 (p.m.)

  • tags: nutrition

      • 2 big reasons you might want to limit smoothies

         

        • decreased satiety as compared to whole foods
        • increased destabilization of blood sugar compared to whole foods

         

        Blending and whirring vegetables and fruits as happens in the making of smoothies disrupts the fiber of the natural food. This disruption impacts the satiety value of that food.  It seems, doesn’t it, that all of the fiber that was there before you blended it should be there in your smoothie.  After all, you didn’t extract the juice from  the apple, the spinach, the blueberries – you just blended it up.  Fiber is fiber, right?

         

        It doesn’t work that way.  Disrupting the fiber, as happens in the process of making a smoothie, exposes more of the surface area of the food.  This means it  is absorbed more quickly, making it more likely that it will effect your blood sugar and insulin levels.  Not only that, but the more of it you want to consume.  When the food is whole, or even chopped, we have more invested in the project of eating by chewing, an important part of the digestive and satiety process.

  • tags: nutrition

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Journal 12/15/2012 (a.m.)

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Journal 12/05/2012 (a.m.)

  • tags: networking

  • “The LocalSystem account is a predefined local account used by the service control manager. This account is not recognized by the security subsystem, so you cannot specify its name in a call to the LookupAccountName function. It has extensive privileges on the local computer, and acts as the computer on the network. Its token includes the NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM and BUILTIN\Administrators SIDs; these accounts have access to most system objects. The name of the account in all locales is .\LocalSystem. The name, LocalSystem or ComputerName\LocalSystem can also be used. This account does not have a password. If you specify the LocalSystem account in a call to the CreateService or ChangeServiceConfig function, any password information you provide is ignored.”

    tags: networking

  • tags: SQL Server environment

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